MTA’s Downtown Flint Location Doubles as Civil Rights Art Museum

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Mass Transportation Authority (MTA) Customer Service Center in downtown Flint isn’t just a hub for public transit. It’s also the site of multiple civil rights-related art pieces.

As a result of a partnership between MTA and the Greater Flints Council, the building houses a bronze statue of Rosa Parks as well as several other pieces of artwork. The statue by artist Anthony Frudakis stands in the building’s front lobby in memory of the woman who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white person. Parks’ arrest on Dec. 1, 1955 sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which is considered to be the beginning of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.

Visitors to the building can also check out 14 stained glass pieces adorning the windows of each of the bus bays. Each scene depicts events relating to a different civil rights movement, including – but not limited to – the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Freedom Riders of 1961.

Outside of the building, at Harrison and Second streets, stands a stainless steel sculpture. Designed by artist Brian Alexander, The Eternal Flame represents “a prayer sent up to God for the deliverance of men from prejudice and warfare.”

Check out the artwork for yourself by visiting the downtown transportation center, at 615 Harrison St., Flint. The center is open on weekdays. To confirm hours during the holidays, click here or call (810) 767-0100.

Wonder what else is going on in #flintandgenesee? See What’s Possible right here.